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evidence of a massacre, the bbc is inside a syrian town. and 50 years after martin luther king's speech, they look at why that dream might still be on fulfill. >> make sense of international -- unfulfilled. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also throughout the globe. three days after islamist militants stormed a gas line in algeria, there is confusion about the face of those taken hostage. hundreds of foreign workers have reportedly been freed, but there are still conflicting reports about the number that might have been killed. the secretary of state level the incident an act of terror. the correspondent has the latest. >> one of the survivors of the attack, the of jury in state television has shown pictures of some that have escaped the gas complex including some for britain starting their journey home. they are just as confused about details of first hostage taking and then the algerian military response. >> obviously, yes. we still don't know what is happening. i cannot say. >> i feel safe for the moment, but i don't know. if the guy is still there, hopefull
class is forging a new path for this city built on steel. >> it has been 50 years since martin luther king made his i have a dream speech future, chie washington mall. the national holiday dedicated to the memory of the civil rights leader. the first black president will be sworn in for his second term. has the dream unfulfilled? that is a topic the historian has been assessing. >> hope this was the biggest excitement of my teenage years. i had never been to a demonstration before. there was such a nifty undertaking. i could see it was part of this, something big was happening. i wanted to be part of this event and part of this movement. the author of the legacy of martin luther king jr.. quite frankly, i could not have imagined myself the professor of history at stanford university editing martin luther king. these are things that were beyond my imagination as a young black teenager whose opportunities were quite limited at that time. >> because of that opel vision and the moral imagination, barricades began to fall and bigotry began to fade. doors of opportunity swung open for an en
"change." >> like martin luther king i still have a dream that this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed and bring the people a new breed change. the mounting death toll in algeria now includes three americans. that, and other important stories, will be at the end of the program tonight. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: washington and the nation were witness again today to the quadrennial pomp and color of a presidential inauguration. it marked the public start to the second obama administration, and it featured presidential appeals to
will be shorter and smaller than president obama's first inaugural. but because it falls on the martin luther king holiday, organizers say attendance monday may be higher than for any other second inauguration. published estimates indicate the private fundraising goal for the festivities is about the same as 2009 when $53 million was raised. four years ago, individual donations were capped at $50,000 per person. this year, the presidential inaugural committee, or p.i.c., is accepting unlimited contributions from both individuals and corporations. p.i.c. c.e.o. and president stephen kerrigan told the newshour about the theme, "our people, our future," as the clock behind him ticked down to monday. >> the president started his campaign back in 2007, really, it started with a conversation with people all across the country about how we can collectively move this country forward. and he has kept that up through his administration and throughout the second campaign, because he really believes that our people are the future of the country and the strength of our country. you know, he's watched the grit
quoting-- and if he isn't, i am-- martin luther king's statement "the moral arc of the universe bends slowly but it bends towards justice." in the first term, president obama did bend that moral arc. he got health insurance, peace of mind for more than 30 million people. the bill may be floored but it's passed. in the second term i see a sort of differently. everyone's attacking the moral arc of justice-- social security medicare, everyone's saying we have to cut it back. that's the great safety net for the american people. i almost see him as a defender. he has to defend social security and medicare in a fiscally responsible way. >> rose: inaugural day 2013, assessment by journalists and looking forward with historians when we continue. >> rose: today barack obama was sworn in for a second time as president of the united states. it was a cold and sunny day in washington. close to a million people came to the inauguration. they came to celebrate and see history. they included former presidents clinton and carter but not president george w. bush and george h.w. bush his father be
's the 50th anniversary of the "i have a dream" speech by dr. martin luther king. it's also on martin luther king holiday. what's the mood there in washington? >> well, i have to tell you, it's a little quiet. i walked by the white house earlier today, and they were still putting up the reviewing stand. there were some folks there. some, you know, very excited. talking to the cab driver on the way over here to the studio tonight, he's saying, yeah, it seems really quiet. i mean, people are definitely coming into town and congress members say they've gotten rid of all the tickets. that they had more people asking for tickets than they could help. so, i mean, but there's no question that it is a little subdued compared to four years ago. last time, of course, there was a new president, new first family. it was a historic election. i think this time it's a little more subdued because there's a little more realism and the level of hope and the expectations are a little lower which may, in fact, be helpful to barack obama in his second term because the expectations the first time were just so sky
. >> ifill: on this day that coincides with the martin luther king, jr., holiday, we get perspective from presidential historians richard norton smith, nn
are closed for the martin luther king, jr., holiday, so we're looking at american innovation and competitiveness. join us for this "n.b.r." special edition: "u.s. innovation." >> tom: a rebound in the housing market and a multitude of new models may help truck sales to their best year since the financial crisis. new trucks unveiled at the north american international auto show in detroit this week aren't just more powerful, they're also more fuel efficient and loaded with new technology. ruben ramirez reports. >> reporter: if 2012 was the year of the fuel efficient "green car," 2013 is shaping up to be the year of the truck. the big three-- gm, ford and chrysler-- all are out with new 2013 models or concept pickups that will start hitting showrooms over the next few years. the three are fierce competitors in the full-size pickup segment where profit margins are larger compared to cars. jeffries auto analyst peter nesvold says automakers make $12,000 to $15,000 in profit for each full-size truck they sell. >> to put that into perspective, small cars might be anywhere from $2,0
.s. innovation. it's our special martin luther king junior holiday edition. and, there's more to learn about innovation, on the "n.b.r." website. "nbr-u" has research from harvard on competitiveness topics. it explores the tendency for firms to focus on what's worked in the past, rather than on the needs of the future. just head to: www.nbr.com and look for the "nbr-u" tab. >> tom: that's "nightly business report" for thursday, january 17. have a great evening everyone, and you too susie. >> susie: goodnight tom, we'll see you online at: www.nbr.com and back here tomorrow night. captioning sponsored by wpbt captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> male announcer: suffering with fatigue, weight gain, and joint pain as you age is simply not necessary. >> we now know that our genes do not determine our health. >> announcer: marcelle pick is a practicing ob/gyn nurse practitioner and women's health expert. she is a best-selling author and cofounded the women to women clinic, where her advice transforms her patients' lives every day. >> you actually have the power to change your
.b.r.," with the markets closed for the martin luther king junior holiday, we bring you an "n.b.r." special edition: u.s. innovation. america has a long history as the world's leading innovator. but what will it take to stay competitive and remain a beacon of innovation? suzanne pratt has the story. >> reporter: the u.s. has put the world behind the wheel and an iphone in millions of pockets. but, we may be losing our competitive edge. some say it's because america's fragile economy is a distraction for corporate america. others point to our inferior infrastructure and subpar public education. but, adam segal senior fellow at the council on foreign relations and author of "advantage" says the big problem is others are gaining ground. >> we have been running in place for the last three or four years because of the recession, spending on r&d, and big ideas seem to be fairly scarce. while china just continues to funnel more and more money into it. >> reporter: still many argue the u.s. will always be extremely competitive because we are the most innovative place in the world. what better place to witnes
ahead. i'm harry lin. >> susie: and that's "nightly business report" for monday, january 21, martin luther king, jr. day. have a great evening, everyone. and you, too, tom. >> tom: good night, susie. we'll see you online at www.nbr.com and back here tomorrow night. captioning sponsored by wpbt captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org cer: (♪ theme music ) (♪) matt elmore: welcome to imagemakers a weekly showcase featuring the best short films from around the world. stay tuned and enjoy the filmmakers of tomorrow today on imagemakers. imagemakers is made possible in part by a grant from: celebrating the vitality and power of the moving image. and by the: (♪) woman talking: so, i wake up this morning (♪) and this guy is in my bed. i'm not quite sure i know him, but, we make some coffee. and we go out for a walk. (♪) (♪) singing: ♪ i see you smile, ♪ i see you there.
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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